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Developers’ Weblog

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  • √ Agreement to pay from company
  • √ Going to drive with some apparently speed-loving brits
  • √ Registration accepted
  • √ Dienstreiseantrag prepared
  • √ Sent that beast to the office ticket queue

So yes, this means I’m going to DebConf 11 to what used to be Yugoslawia when I was there the last time, although in the Poreč region of Istria, Hrvatska.

(First posting to Plänet Commandline! Tag: pcli)

Vutral asked in IRC how to synchronise two shells’ environment while they’re running. As you may know, POSIX systems cannot change a process’ environment vector after it has been started, only the process itself can. Well, the shell can, and we’ll use a variety of things for this.

This trick assumes you have $HISTFILE set to the same pathname in both shells (obviously, they run under the same user). It uses export -p to render the current list of exported variables, then transforms the list from newline-separated to a single big one-line export statement.
Then it transforms all remaining newlines (which will be part of a single-quoted string, since that’s mksh(1)’s export format) into the sequence '$'\n'' which means: terminate current single-quoted string, append $'\n' and open up a new single-quoted string immediately; concatenate these three.
Now, $'\n' is just a fancy way of saying newline, and part of mksh because David Korn (yes, the Korn in Korn Shell) strongly suggested to me that this functionality be included – but, as we can see here, it pays off.
Finally, the so transformed string is prepended by unset \$(export); which, when executed, will cause the shell to unset (and unexport) all currently exported variables. The shell parameters that are not exported, i.e. not in the environment, are not affected by this code (except for $x and $nl, but… whatever).
This string is then passed to read -s (plus -r and clearing IFS to enable raw mode), which means, read into the parameter $REPLY (which we conveniently don’t use – but it’s trashed too, thus) but store into history at the same time.

Ah hah! Now, the persistent history feature comes into effect! After running the below statement in the “source” shell, switch into the terminal running the “destination” shell, press Enter once on the empty line (Ctrl-U to empty it if it wasn’t), then Cursor-Up (↑) to recall… voilà, an insanely large line with the previously created string sorta expanded… and press Enter again to run it. Now your set of exported parameters is the exact same (minus if you exported IFS, nl, x or REPLY) as in the “source” shell.

I’ve added extra spaces and a linewrap below, this is really just one big line:

nl=$'\n'; x=$(export -p); x=${x//${nl}export/}; IFS= read -rs <<<"unset \\\$(export);${x//$nl/\'\$\'\\\\n\'\'}"

Of course, this makes a nice function, for your ~/.mkshrc or somesuch.

I’m still working on mksh and doing some MirBSD core and ports work in between. On the other hand, since a lot of things suck so much, and other things become unacceptable, I’m seriously considering writing things like a libc (probably not complete, not totally from scratch – no way I’m going to code sunrpc – and not fast but at least correct. I’ve written quite some code for the MirBSD libc already, as well as kernel and bootloader. Most of it is shared between these, and I’ve digged in enough others (klibc, dietlibc, µClibc, musl, glibc) to have seen more. I was thinking of static linkage only at first, mostly for bootloader and compiler support code and, later, to link mksh statically against it on some OSes. But cnuke@ wanted a “correct” libc with dynamic linkage. Hmm… (On the other hand, we all know that these are dreams and a RL job can be time and will consuming.)

Roland Mas is hacking on Alioth this weekend, which runs code from me and some coworkers via FusionForge – more coverage ☺ I’m also doing okay with Debian/m68k (still slowly of course, but then, as BSD developer, I’m used to that *g*) and one of the old m68k buildds may very well be resurrected soonish. (Still need to port elfutils…) By the way, XHTML sucks, some things are hard to get right, and writing a DTD should be obsolete…

I took over cvs(1) in Debian and replaced it with my previously private package of MirPorts’ cvs. Way to go! (Thanks to Steve for handing over maintainership.) Now, everyone, please test it and recheck whether your old bugs still apply. Oh, and send patches. But pserver, PAM etc. are gone for good, don’t bother.

PS: It’s still Google Go, Benny. (World of Google’s goo?)

Progress with pkgsrc

19.05.2011 by bsiegert@
Tags: pkgsrc

The MirOS support for pkgsrc is progressing, albeit very slowly. This is because I spend more time traveling for work than in the office. After a long day of meetings and conferences, I am no longer motivated to code in my free time. What’s more, several different projects at work have tight deadlines.

Having said this, I committed MirOS support for libtool-2.2.6b in pkgsrc the other day, after a positive review by agc. As for the bmake patch, which is still available from our pkgsrc page, I was told to redo the patch, this time for src/usr.bin/make directly. When this patch will have gone in, somebody else (joerg?) will sync pkgsrc/devel/bmake, and MirOS will be able to bootstrap pkgsrc without patches. Let’s try to get to this point before the 2011Q2 branch.

The new “showcase” machine that I bought a while ago, does not have working network connectivity and SATA under MirOS. tg@ recommended an installation into an HVM guest under Xen. I am currently trying to set this up, however I must first succeed to get a stable NetBSD Dom0 system. I am using NetBSD-current because it has the right network driver and a custom kernel, however the console seems flakey, and accessing /kern/xen (even just ls!) leaves the process hanging in the “tstile” state. pkgsrc has four versions of Xen, so I should just test them all until I find one that works.

PS: My Go package, image/tiff is now part of the standard library. Yay!

:(

19.05.2011 by bsiegert@

I hope I will never again have to attend a funeral for a friend who committed suicide.

That is all.

in-target: E: Kaputte Pakete

11.04.2011 by tg@
Tags: bug debian rant

*buntu Hardy kann zur Zeit nicht installiert werden (der Kernel (in main) dependet auf Pakete aus restrictet, das ist aber zum Installationszeitpunkt nicht aktiv und sowieso unfrei; und wieso ist eigentlich das hardy-updates Repo im d-i eingeschaltet und nicht erst hinterher?).

Lustiger aber: „Einige Pakete konnten nicht installiert werden. Das kann bedeuten, dass[sic!] Sie eine unmögliche Situation angefordert haben oder dass[sic!], wenn Sie die Unstable-Distribution verwenden, […]“

gecko2s Kommentar dazu nur, daß unstable bei *buntu stable heiße. Ich habs dann auf LTS korrigiert (ist nicht das erste Mal – und sowieso, wieso tauschen die in einer stabilen Version PostgreSQL-Majorversionen aus?) und dabei haben wir’s belassen: Debian unstable = *buntu LTS.

Naja, wie wir das letztens Simon gesagt haben (Upgrade innerhalb einer Version von *buntu auf einem Server hat grub durch grub2 ausgetauscht): Mit Debian wär’ das nicht passiert!

Various joys

26.03.2011 by tg@
Tags: debian

I’m online again. (In case you didn’t notice, duh…) Seems as if we (the Telco/ISP guy and me) just needed to look at it hard enough for it to go away – first he could dial in, using my account data, which I probably should change now, then herc with ppp(8) and pppoe(8) was working (although at about 50 KiB/s down, he showed me 508 KiB/s – a rate I had never achieved – with his WiXP), then I took my notebook, which worked with pppoe(4). Now herc’s working again. (Maybe altq(9) can explain the slowdown? Hm, from debian.netcologne.de I get 500 so it looks okay.)
But eurynome isn’t, oh the joy. Luckily, gecko2 who administers its host system just woke up.

Things we do want to see: the Telco/ISP guy accepting that I run MirBSD on a P-233MMX box with Hercules graphics card and a 9″ monitor with no comment other than considering its age (and that it usually runs 24/7) as partial cause for the bug. Thanks, Netcologne!

Things we don’t want to see:
Mar 26 10:40:02 blau /bsd: signal 11 received by (screen:16857) UID(2999) EUID(2999), parent (screen:19111) UID(2999) EUID(2999)
“Suddenly the Dungeon collapses!! - You die...” (luckily, I get it about once a year only)

ObCoffeeSpices: Marrakech (Cumin, Allspice, Cumin Aroma) – though, due to its relative strength compared to the others, the only coffee spice I have left. And another hint: pre-warming the coffee cup with hot water, so it doesn’t cool down too fast with the amounts of milk I put in, rocks.

I just wore the Squeeze Release (FOSDEM, Spacefun) T-Shirt to the bakery and got asked by a neighbour: “Oh, a Debian fan?” “Developer, even” – now imagine the typical “informed interested guy” talk for a conference booth of your OS of choice here. How proud he was to get his wife and himself Windows®-free at home; how he likes to tinker a bit (if he’s got any time left), which has become harder with Windows; how his time constraints have him at OpenSuSE currently but asked how squeeze is; and the usual complaints at places like $ork where they have to use Windows® and MSIE (apparently you can’t centrally manage Firefox, eh, good someone tells me, because that’s what we do…). Wow. Anyway, it’s spring, so people, wear your shirts. (Hrm, what do I make of the fact that this is my only Debian shirt – although I’m thinking how to get Tartan Trousers if money were no issue – and nobody had ever commented on my various BSD, FOSDEM, FrOSCon, etc. wear…)

Debugging PPPoE

24.03.2011 by tg@

⸘Did you know…

	sudo tail -f /var/log/messages &
	sudo tcpdump -ovvlns1500 -eine3 &
	sudo ifconfig pppoe0 debug up
 

… still no network ☹ but at least I got some more information, and the L-Technicians will have a look at it tomorrow as well.

’M back.

21.03.2011 by tg@

Two DNF out of four geocaches, well… one was too muggled, the other was no longer there, judging from the previous visitors’ log entries. Cached with natureshadow and bought his book on how not to cycle across Germany.

CLT was a blast, and it’s refreshing to attend an event without having to drive a booth of our own. Talked to lots of people. Since the boss was paying, even did some mingling in that area.

My ADSL line has been hiccupping ☹

Yawn.

19.03.2011 by tg@
Tags: debian event geocache grml

Will drive to Chemnitz now. Maybe meet me there. No booth, just visiting to meet everyone again, rather spontaneous.

Rhonda suggested I document how to use the LLS (Launchpad Login Service – their implementation of an OpenID provider) as Delegate, which basically means, you can put something up on your webpage, which can be a simple static (X)HTML page like mine (a /index.htm is especially nice, a /~user/index.htm works too), and use its URI and not https://launchpad.net/~me to login. For example, this often hides the LLS from view e.g. in blog comments, such as those where Canonical is being criticised ☺ – but it’s also yours, easier to type and to change if you switch service providers.

The basic idea is to go to your Launchpad user page and view its page source. Look for openid relation links in the header – on Rhonda’s the value we’re looking for is “cyLQbcp”, and you see it several times.

Now you put this on your web page:

	<!-- begin: OpenID delegation to LP -->
	 <link rel="openid.server" href="https://login.launchpad.net/+openid" />
	 <link rel="openid.delegate" href="https://login.launchpad.net/+id/cyLQbcp" />
	 <link rel="openid2.provider" href="https://login.launchpad.net/+openid" />
	 <link rel="openid2.local_id" href="https://login.launchpad.net/+id/cyLQbcp" />
	<!-- end: OpenID delegation -->
 

Of course, insert your, not Rhonda’s, ID. Do note that we don’t copy the X-XRDS-Location tag (that breaks things for some unknown reason), but otherwise, what we insert on our page is pretty much a copy of the info on the user page (maybe it’s a Delegate page, too?).

As usual, try at your own risk, bug Canonical if it breaks. It works with AO3, Gerrit Code Review, and others though (interestingly enough, better in Lynx than GUI browsers because I stay logged in across Lynx sessions (and just have to confirm sending “my information” to the accessing site), whereas I have to re-login to the LLS in every GUI browser session).

As with the LLS generally, “to access a site which is not recognised” is expected and worked on with low urgency (mostly cosmetical, I think).

A few days ago, somebody sent me an e-mail with a few questions about the Go programming language, of which I am a coauthor and contributor. The questions concerned my general impression, the experience I had in it, the future and some good areas of application. Here is my reply.

In my experience, when people try Go, there are two phases: On a first glance, it does not seem very special. However, many that do try it quickly become hooked.

I myself was primarily programming in C when I started using Go. I had written some code in Limbo, which an be seen as the predecessor of Go, so trying it seemed natural. I quickly discovered that it is a very well-designed language, whose constructs make perfect sense and are easy to grasp. The standard library is also very well done and makes many common programming jobs easy.

I decided to write a project I did for work in Go. However, the target was a Windows system, so I became involved in the Windows port. My first contributions were to the path package. It is a nice experience working with such bright and professional people as the Go developers. While they can be sometimes a bit terse in code reviews, they are very talented people. I found myself thinking a long time about a single sentence in a review before finally “getting it”.

Speaking of which, the code review process is very efficient for the development of the language.

In the future, I think Go will get a much wider adoption, and be usable also for writing “native” graphical user interface programs. There is a WinAPI port for creating Windows GUIs, and there is a very good Gtk+ adapter for Unix-like systems. I can also see it being used a lot for network servers, such as HTTP application servers and so on.

In these two areas, parallelism is a key point. In a GUI application, you want the interface to remain reactive during calculations and I/O, which is very easy to do with multiple goroutines. In a network application, you also have to process many requests in parallel. Go has the potential to scale significantly better than other languages. Maybe will even be one of the answers to the problem of programming for ever more parallel machines, as almost all new computers have multiple CPU cores.

I also think that there will be more optimization so the language will get much faster in the future. It is already faster than Python in most cases (easy, since it is a compiled language) but just as easy for many.

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